learn how growing food in the city is changing

Research and Development in Urban Agriculture

researching the latest innovations in

food growing for our cities

development projects to explore methods for sustainable eating

At AllotMe, we want it to be easy for anyone to have access to a sustainable way to source their food. Through research and development   projects, we  search for solutions to the  growing issue  in our cities of food resourcing.

 

By 2050, it is estimated that 70% of the earth's population will be living in cities, which is why we believe in the importance of having sustainable infrastructure in place to feed the growing population.

how it works

Our first instinct led us to the creation of a digital platform to help more people to grow their own food in the city. We'll  pair local residents with available space and gardens in their area. In London, less than 40% of us have their own private garden space, but still want the opportunity to eat healthier and more sustainably from our own patch. At AllotMe, we want finding a vegetable patch to be as easy as ordering a taxi or booking a b&b.

Click here to view our demo!

alloting you

In big cities like London, allocating space for anything comes at a premium. With more and more people moving into cities, space for growing food is getting pushed further and further aside. At AllotMe, we want to intervene! Our solution is simple, and effective: Make use of every piece of under-utilised land in our cities with semi-permanent solutions for growing food. Find out more...

the plot

allotme urban agriculture r&d enterprie sustainable gardening

Whilst we’re pairing up would-be green fingers to local allotments, we’ll also be on the hunt for unused spaces in the city that are ripe for new plots. At AllotMe, we’ll be giving you the power to rent your garden or space to be turned into a thriving vegetable patch. Join the growing movement  across the world of turning unused lots into vibrant plots!

Got some space to create a new patch?

planting seeds